57: Newspapers
57:1  Brief History
57:2  Waechter Und Anzeiger
57:3 Waechter Und Anzeiger
57:4  Suburban News And Herald
57:5  A New And Progressive Industry In Lakewood
57:6  "Unique Home For Printing Plant" Complimented In "The Inland Printer"
57:7  Untitled
57:8  Unique Home For Printing-Plant













57:1
BRIEF HISTORY
STORY OF LAKEWOOD -- E.G. LINDSTROM Pg. 151

LAKEWOOD HERALD -- Founded 1909 by Geoffrey Sutliff. A Republican paper published every Friday. Paper sold to F.G. and W.J. Theuer in 1911 and name changed to Suburban News and Herald.
 

LAKEWOOD PRESS -- Founded in 1918. Editor, Walter E. Pagan; published every Thursday at the Lakewood Publishing Company; no circulation given. Paper suspended in 1923. Subscription $2.00 per annum.

MASONIC OUTLOOK -- Founded in 1935, Don Peden, editor. Official lodge bulletin, Masonic Temple. Published monthly at Kneale Printing Company. Cleveland, Ohio, Subscription $1.00 per annum.

ROCKY RIVER NEWS -- Founded 1932 by Mr. and Mrs. C.R. Walker who edit and publish it every Friday. Non-partisan paper, free distribution.

LAKEWOOD INDEPENDENT -- Founded by 1909 by Harry S. Hart. A Republican Paper published every Friday. Paper suspended in 1911.

SUBURBAN NEWS AND HERALD -- Founded in 1911 by F.G. Theuer and W.J. Theuer. In 1909-1910 Geoffrey Sutliff published the Lakewood Herald which was bought by Messrs. Theuer and the name changed to the present Suburban News and Herald. A Republican paper, published every Friday.

COURIER -- Founded in 1902 by Maurice Welfare; called the Lakewood Courier until 1933 when the name was listed as Courier. A Democrat paper published every Thursday. Suspended in December, 1939.

LAKEWOOD POST AND WEST SHORE POST -- Founded in 1924.  Independent paper published every Friday. Originally published as Lakewood Post; name changed to Lakewood Post and West Shore Post in 1928. Publishers, John Lewis Shissler and Ray D. Hawley.

MASONIC HIGH TWELVE -- Founded in 1924, E. George Lindstrom, editor. Founded as the Lakewood Mason. Name changed to the present Masonic High Twelve in 1930. Published monthly at 310 Lakeside Avenue West, Cleveland, Ohio. Subscription rate $1.00 per annum.
 
 

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57:2
WAECHTER UND ANZEIGER
(Barred from Lakewood)
LAKEWOOD PRESS -- May 23, 1918 Pg. 1

"Thirty", the goodnight symbol of the newspaper office, came in the existence of the Waechter und Anzeiger, so far as Lakewood is concerned, last night.

Councilman T.B. Armstrong presented a resolution showing that the council of the City of Lakewood is opposed to the circulation of the Waechter in this city.

Without a dissenting voice the suburb council voted to prohibit the distribution of all German language newspapers there.

Loyal residents of Lakewood who packed the council chamber, knowing that action would be taken against the publication, broke into a cheer and applauded following the unanimous ballot.

The resolution, which stated that German language newspapers are a "menace to the peace of cities in particular and the nation in general", was discussed pro and con. It first read that all foreign publications be barred. This was opposed and it was afterward amended to read "German language newspapers", and the opposition was withdrawn.

A representative of the Waechter und Anzeiger was present and declared the paper to be loyal. Several of the crowd who voluntarily addressed council, did not share this view.

"I don't know whether the council's action would be upheld in court or not, but it at least shows the sentiment of the people of Lakewood," Mayor B.M. Cook said last night.
 
 

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57:3
WAECHTER UND ANZEIGER
LAKEWOOD PRESS -- May 30, 1918 Pg. 4

At a recent meeting of the Lakewood city council, a resolution was passed whereby the council went on record as against the circulation of the Waechter und Anzeiger within the city of Lakewood. Why was this attitude shown toward this paper? Was it because it is printed in the German language? Was it because it had upheld the German government in its attempt to enslave the world? Not necessarily so, but the people of Lakewood, as everywhere in the United States, who are true Americans, remember that this paper justified the sinking of the Lusitania when innocent non-combatants were murdered, among them helpless little children, who went to watery graves without the helping hand of a father or mother being given an opportunity to attempt a rescue of their loved ones.

Just stop to think of what it would mean to the readers of this paper to have that happen to your precious little ones, to know that neither you nor your children had in any way offended or injured the dirty, contemptible cures who had ordered the murder of your children and others dear to you.

It is because this paper justified the sinking and the murder of innocents, because that "Hun snake", the German ambassador, "had warned", in other words, attempted to tell us Americans where we would be permitted to go and when we could go.

If this paper realized that it was wrong in its attitude in this justification of these murders, why did it not immediately discharge the men responsible for this justification? Why did it not immediately say to the government of the United States, which is the very people themselves, that the paper did not uphold this murder, that it believed its writers who had upheld and justified it were a menace to the very people in whose midst they were living and turn them over to the proper authorities?

Why did they wait for the government of the United States to take these "curs" from their desks and place them where  they could not act as the agents and accomplices of the murderers?

These are the things the people of Lakewood cannot forget and "never" will forget, even if these were the only outrages perpetrated by the beasts, who were justified by this paper in their cruelties more terrible than were ever know among civilized nations.

The Waechter and Anzeiger is no doubt complying with the law enacted to control the news and editorials printed in the German and other foreign language newspapers, but it must not blame the people if they cannot show the real Christian spirit of forgiveness for past deeds when it upheld the acts of the most unChristian, uncivilized, contemptible and treacherous beast, in the shape of man the world has ever known.
 
 

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57:4
SUBURBAN NEWS AND HERALD
SUBURBAN NEWS AND HERALD (July 17, 1936)

A quarter of a century ago, in the hardware store of Ed. Heiser on Detroit avenue opposite the present hospital site a small group of young men gathered for the purpose of perfecting organization in the publishing of a newspaper in the City of Lakewood.

Those present at the initial meeting were, Ed  Heiser, Howard D. Mills, F.G. Theuer, and W.J. Theuer.

At that time F.G. Theuer was operating the business end of a newspaper with Geoffrey Sutcliffe as the publisher on the south side of Cleveland known as the Brooklyn Herald with Howard D. Mills in charge of the news and editorial staff.

This first meeting culminated in the determination to definitely publish a newspaper herein and a second meeting was held in the spacious rooms of the Theuer residence on Detroit avenue still maintained by Theuer interests, at which time officers of the new publishing venture were elected.

The first officers of the new corporation know as The Suburban Publishing Co. incorporated in the year 1911 were D.H. Mills, president; J.W. Theuer, vice-president and treasurer; and William F. Kees, secretary. The active management were in the hands of Howard D. Mills, W.J. Theuer and F.G. Theuer, serving as editor, business manager and general manager.

The secretarial work of the office was in charge of Ruth S. Theuer who has so loyally stood by as the newspaper in its successful tenure over a span of years experienced its "ups and downs."

In February 25, 1915, the Suburban News took over its only competitor, The Lakewood Herald, and part of the announcement made then was follows:

"The management of both newspapers realize that greater results and benefits will accrue to the merchants in the merger," and was signed by Geoffrey Sutcliffe of The Lakewood Herald and F.G. Theuer of The Suburban News, general managers respectively.

On June 25, 1915 the newspaper announced a subscription campaign conducted by Boy Scouts and on August 1, 1915, The Suburban News & Herald distributed its first issue through the mails, thereby becoming a paid newspaper.

Associated with me in the editorial department of The Suburban News over a twenty-five year span were men outstanding in the journalistic field.

They were Howard Mills, Ira O. Hoffman, formerly of the Cleveland Press, the late Benjamin E. Cushing, telegraph editor of the Cleveland News and Dr. W.W. Totheroh of the Astabula-Beacon Star and more recently John S. Fyke, now one of the most influential young Democratic leaders in the county and state.

These men while in the employ of The Suburban News & Herald all resided in and loved Lakewood and fought hard in defense of movements affecting the "City of Homes."

R.E. Porter, who is a pioneer Lakewoodite in the filed of journalism and Miss Susan Sterling, always active in behalf of justice in politics for both men and women are still loyal contributors of alert news to the present staff.

The Suburban News & Herald has met its competition fairly and at this writing is practically one of the few weekly subscription newspapers in Cuyahoga County.

Their first office space was occupied in tow small rooms in the McCaskey block, then Lakewood’s only three story business building of any consequence located at Belle and Detroit avenues, then known as the hub of the business wheel of Lakewood.

Well, do I recall and cherish the memories of those days when I attended the first meeting of the city fathers. Bernard Miller had just relinquished the reins as Lakewood mayor and N.C. Cotabish then quite an executive influence in the National Carbon Company followed in his footsteps with J.B. Coffinberry, (the only Democratic mayor), Clayton W. Tyler, Byron M. Cook, A.O. Guild, Louis E. Hill, Edward A. Wiegand and now Amos I. Kauffman as mayors.

The newspaper in its early stages had appeal and grew so rapidly that new and larger quarters were sought in a new building just completed at St. Charles and Detroit avenue wherein the St. Charles theatre was established in the silent drama days, and on the second floor The Suburban News & Herald shared practically all the office space with Stemmerding & Quick, early real estate developers in Lakewood.

This same building today serves as a community center for many Lakewood organizations, supplanting the once popular McCaskey block which in Lakewood’s early days served as a public meeting place.

In a few years The Suburban News and Herald still growing needed larger quarters and at that time could not secure them as office space was scarce in those days due to lack of modern buildings, so they decided to construct their own two story building at Lakewood and Detroit avenues which stands today as a monument among the better built buildings of the city.

Construction work which started in early 1921 was rushed to completion so that The Suburban News & Herald was able to occupy their permanent quarters in September of that year.

The Suburban News & Herald in establishing its right herein I believe is here to stay and only through the fine and loyal support given it by merchants and subscribers alike over this twenty-five year span can this newspaper continue to give conscientious newspaper service.
 
 

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57:5
A NEW AND PROGRESSIVE INDUSTRY IN LAKEWOOD
BY FRANKLIN J. MILLER

In providing for the machine typesetting The Lakewood Press has turned over this branch of their model plant to two well know printers and linotype operators, E. George Lindstrom and Edward B. Schneider, experts in their line, who have purchased two of the most popular models of typesetting machines, Nos. 5 and 8 respectively. The linotypes are capable of producing the highest class of newspaper, book and catalogue work. The No. 5 will be used to provide composition of newspapers, while the No. 8 has unlimited possibilities, carrying three magazines that are capable of producing six faces of type without getting up from the chair, and this can be done within the fraction of a minute by the operator at the keyboard. Everything connected with this most intricate machine is new and the management of The Lakewood Press chose a series of Century and Old Style, two of the finest faces for newspaper work obtainable, wishing to give its readers a clean cut and easily read face.

The management of The Lakewood Press has given these two men the best consideration and they placed these typesetting machines on the first floor of their magnificent new home, surrounded by beauty no other linotypes in this country can boast of. Messrs. Lindstrom and Schneider can truly feel proud of this opportunity and will be congratulated by their former workers and friends in the newspaper profession.

Mr. Lindstrom has been in the newspaper and printing trades for over twenty years, and has been employed on many of the metropolitan newspapers and large job plants in Boston and New York, and has been in and about Cleveland for the past fifteen years and his wide experience has fitted him for this undertaking. A few years ago Mr. Lindstrom spent sex weeks in the instruction department of the factory of the Mergenthaler Linotype Company in New York where he learned the rudiments and construction of the machine, and has had the privilege of not caring for a battery of machines but installing them as well, and he undertook the task, assisted by Mr. Schneider, of assembling the thousands of parts, that come all packed in boxes and making the machine produce lines of type within ten hours after the machine reached its destination.

Mr. Lindstrom has been associated with The Lakewood Press ever since it launched into the sea of newspaperdom as a writer of special features and was requested by the management to organize this branch of the mechanical department, and will assume the superintendency of all the printing departments.

Mr. Schneider has had twenty-five years' experience in the printing industry, which makes him a valuable asset to his partner and co-worker. He has worked in Cleveland, went to New York City, and for thirteen years was connected with the American Press Association, where his services and deportment was greatly appreciated. Mr. Schneider returned to Cleveland a few years ago and has been connected with one of the larger and best job establishments, and he feels that no better opportunity could present itself than to become associated with The Lakewood Publishing Company.

These two men have the unique distinction of outgrowing their plant before installing all their machinery and equipment. While waiting for their new Model 8 linotype the future of the Lakewood Publishing Company appeared so great that they realized they would be unable to give the service they hoped to boast of. Realizing the Mergenthaler Linotype Company could not make an immediate shipment they purchased the plant of The Great Lakes Weekly, a marine paper published in Cleveland, who in turn have contracted with the Lakewood Publishing Company to hereafter print their live and growing weekly.

With these two machines and a fine selection of type faces Messrs. Lindstrom and Schneider will at all times be able to handle the composition for all the publications of the Lakewood Publishing Company, and also be in a position to handle trade composition, such as book work, house organs, programs and catalogues.
 
 

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57:6
"UNIQUE HOME FOR PRINTING PLANT" COMPLIMENTED IN "THE INLAND PRINTER"

The Inland Printer, published at Chicago, one the best know and leading journals in the profession, pays a high compliment to the Lakewood Press in its current issue. It publishes a two column photograph of the building at the junction of Detroit and Cook avenues and has this reference to the new plant of the paper:

"The average person who is accustomed to seeing a printing-plant in the dark back room will be agreeably surprised as he passes the new home of The Lakewood Press, Cleveland, Ohio. The offices are housed in an attractive residence building, one of the finest dwellings in the city of Lakewood a suburb of Cleveland,

In making the house over to accommodate the newspaper plant the new owners have not destroyed the beauty of the interior of the house. Outside, except for the neat sign accouncing "The Lakewood Press" building might be mistaken for the home of a wealthy resident of the city. In leaving the resident as it was while occupied as a home the new owners felt that inspiration might be found for better work in such surroundings; that the newspaper might be a better paper than if evolved out of the dirt and dust and untidy environments of the ordinary plant. In its exterior and interior, the new home of The Lakewood Press is one of the show places of the city, a matter of note and envy of other printing-plants over the country. A review of the mechanical features of the newspaper will be found under the heading, "Review of Newspapers and Advertisements,' elsewhere in this issue.

"Capt. Walter E. Pagan is editor and manager, and Samuel P. Burrell is associate editor of the newspaper. E.C. Greenfield is the head of the art department. The composition of The Lakewood Press is furnished by the Lindstrom-Schneider Linotype Service, a separate organization, E. George Lindstrom and Edward B. Schneider  being the guiding thoughts of the concern.

Both are practical printers, and come to The Lakewood Press with a fund of experience picked up in metropolitan cities over the United States where they have worked."

Lakewood is taking on big airs in more respects than one. A linotype plant has been established in that thriving municipality by E.G. Lindstrom and E.B. Schneider, who grind out the matter for the Lakewood Press and also cater to the trade generally. Both members have had wide experience in the printing game, and if the Lakewooders back them up as they should they will give a good account of themselves in spreading the fame of that beautiful suburb to the four corners of the earth.
 
 

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57:7
UNTITLED
THE INLAND PRINTER December, 1919

The linotype of Lindstrom & Schneider, doing linotype work for the Lakewood Press and the trade, has dissolved partnership, Mr. Schenider leaving the firm to seek diversion elsewhere. Mr. Lindstrom will continue the business.
 
 

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57:8
UNIQUE HOME FOR PRINTING PLANT
THE INLAND PRINTER December, 1919

The average person who is accustomed to seeing a printing-plant in a dark back room will be agreeably surprised as he passes the new home of The Lakewood Press, Cleveland, Ohio. The offices are housed in an attractive residence building, one of the finest dwellings in the city of Lakewood, a suburb of Cleveland.

In making the house over to accommodate the newspaper plant, the new owners have not destroyed the beauty of the interior of the dwelling. Outside, except for the neat sign announcing "The Lakewood Press," the building might be mistaken for the home of a wealthy resident of the city. In leaving the residence much as it was while occupied as a home, the new owners felt that some inspiration might be found for better work in such surroundings; that the newspaper might be a better paper than if evolved out of the dirt and dust and untidy environments of the ordinary plant. In its exterior and interior, the new home of The Lakewood Press is one of the show places of the city, a matter of note and envy of other printing-plants over the country. A review of the mechanical features of the newspaper will be found under the heading, "Review of Newspapers and Advertisements," elsewhere in this issue.

Walter E. Pagan is editor and manager, and Samuel P. Burrill is associate editor of the newspaper. E.C. Greenfield is the head of the art department. The composition of The Lakewood Press is furnished by the Lindstrom-Schneider Linotype Service, a separate organization, E.G. Lindstrom and E.B. Schneider being the guiding thought of the concern. Both are practical printers, and come The Lakewood Press with a fund of experience picked up in metropolitan cities over the United States where they have worked.
 
 


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